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PGCEs were held by 66 per cent of the teacher sample (including 82 per cent of secondary teacher respondents and 50 per cent of the primary teacher sample). Very small numbers (four per cent) had undertaken school- based training e. The primary sample included teachers of all year groups, with the highest proportion (23 per cent) taking a Year 1 class and 18 per cent each taking Year 3 or Year 4. Around 15 per cent each taught Year 2 or Year 6 - a higher proportion than in the first year of the evaluation.

As professional research writers had been the case in the first year of the evaluation, substantially more primary teacher respondents (92 per cent) than secondary teachers (56 per cent) held an area of responsibility in school other than their classroom teaching. For 85 per cent of these primary teachers, this involved the coordination of a subject area.

The most commonly undertaken role at secondary level involved a particular responsibility essay writers for pay within a subject area. Markedly more third year teachers (80 per cent) than their second year counterparts (67 per cent) held extra responsibilities in school. Year 3 (2004) - EPD teacher survey respondents Presented below are the characteristics of the 1,373-strong EPD teacher survey sample in the third year of the evaluation. Additional characteristics were not sought in year 3. Phase of school 685 (50 per cent) taught the primary age range, 678 (49 per cent) were secondary teachers and ten (1 per cent) worked in SEN schools or PRUs. Year of teaching 710 (52 per cent) were in the second year of their careers and 663 (48 per cent) were in their third year.

Any similarities and differences in the constituents of the comparative and the Year 2 EPD teacher samples are also highlighted. Phase of school 657 (43 per cent) taught the primary age range, 863 (56 per cent) were secondary teachers and ten (one per cent) respondents taught in SEN schools or PRUs. The EPD teacher sample was evenly split between primary and secondary respondents. Year of teaching 857 (56 per cent) of comparative teachers were in the second year of their careers and 673 (44 per cent) were in the third year. The year 2 EPD teacher sample contained a higher proportion of third year teachers (53 per cent). Overall, 78 per cent of the comparative sample was female compared with 76 per cent of the EPD sample. Perhaps because of the higher proportion of second year teachers, the comparative sample was, on average, slightly younger than the EPD sample. The greatest proportion of the comparative sample (40 per cent) was aged 25 or younger (the corresponding proportion for the EPD teacher sample was 32 per cent). Thirty-three per cent of the comparative teacher sample was aged 26-30, with 17 per cent aged between 3 1 — 40 and ten per cent over 41. The EPD teachers and the comparative teachers took almost identical routes into teaching. The majority of both samples had completed first degrees and then a PGCE, with 66 per cent of the professional research writers EPD teachers and 68 per cent of the comparative following this route. In both the comparative and the EPD teacher samples, professional research writers 82 per cent of secondary respondents and 50 per cent of the primary respondents held a PGCE.

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Sc with QTS, whilst around eight per cent held a B. Year group As with the EPD teacher sample, primary comparative teachers most often taught Years 1, 3 or 4. Fifteen per cent taught a Year 2 class (as was the case for EPD primary teacher respondents) whilst ten per cent taught a Year 6 class compared with 14 per cent of EPD primary teachers. Subject specialism 21 The top six subject specialisms of the secondary teacher respondents in the comparative sample mirrored those of the EPD secondary teacher sample: sciences (16 per cent), English, PE, languages, maths and history.

Role in school A similar proportion of comparative and EPD teachers held extra roles in school (71 per cent and 74 per cent respectively). As was the case in the EPD teacher sample, the third year teachers (76 per cent) and primary teachers (90 per cent) in the comparative sample most often cited additional duties. Phase of school Years in teaching Role in school Gender Ethnicity 242 (65 per cent) taught the primary age range, 125 (34 per cent) were from secondary schools and three (one per cent) worked in SEN schools or PRUs. The majority of mentor respondents had considerable teaching experience: 44 per cent had been in the profession for 21 years or more, while 29 per cent had between 11-20 years of service. Newer staff were also acting as mentors at both primary and secondary level: 10 per cent had 3-6 years of experience and 16 per cent had been teachers for 7-10 years.

In primary schools, mentoring was frequently performed by very senior staff: 59 per cent of primary mentors were deputy heads or headteachers. Reflecting the different staffing structure in secondary schools, the mentoring role here was performed most often by heads of department (45 per cent of mentor respondents from these schools held this responsibility).

Twenty-three per cent of secondary mentors were deputy heads. Overall, 75 per cent were female (in secondary schools, 45 per cent of surveyed mentors were male compared with 13 per cent in the primaries). Mainly white (97 per cent) with small numbers of Black African, Black Caribbean, Indian, Bangladeshi, Pakistani and Chinese. Year 2 (2003) - EPD mentor survey respondents Presented below are the characteristics of the 476-strong mentor sample in the second year of the evaluation.

Phase of school 278 (58 per cent) taught the primary age range, 192 (40 per cent) were from secondary schools and six (1 per cent) taught in SEN schools or PRUs. Years in teaching Forty-one per cent of surveyed mentors had been in the profession for 2 1 years or more, while 30 per cent had between 1 1-20 years of service. At both primary and secondary level, 1 1 per cent had 3-6 years of experience and 16 per cent had been teachers for 7-10 years.

Role in school In primary schools, 62 per cent of mentor respondents were deputy heads or headteachers. In secondary schools, the mentoring role was performed most often by heads of department (42 per cent of mentor respondents from these schools held this responsibility).

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